Talent search! Announcing the 2015 PUP Stars Calendar

2015 PUP STARS CALENDAR: MAKE YOUR DOG A STAR!

 

Do you see stars, red carpets, and celebrity perks in your pooch’s future? If you’ve adopted a dog from PUP, your dog’s photo is eligible to be Lucyone of our Stars!

What kind of photo? Be creative or send us a favorite with a story telling us why your PUP is a star in your home.

Why a calendar for our Stars? PUP is committed to finding good homes for homeless, abused and neglected dogs. Our three biggest expenses are quality medical care, transportation and food. Our calendar helps cover the rising costs of these expenses.

All past entrants are eligible to be a Dog of the Month or Cover Dog.

How do I enter my dog in the talent search?

  1. Submit $35 entry fee (via check or Paypal – see below) no later than August 1, 2014.
  2. All entrants will receive two calendars.
  3. Upon receipt of entry fee, photo and story instructions will be forwarded to you.
  4. If you mail a check, please include your email address to receive photo and story instructions. Photos are due by August 17.

If you don’t want to send a photo and want to support PUP, you can click the PayPal link or mail a check to the PUP address below to make a donation.

PUP
PO Box 1691
Issaquah, WA 98027

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Thank you for your continued support!

Laura Tonkin, Director

Issaquah Petco Adoption Event, 7/26

It’s an adoption extravaganza at Issaquah Petco this weekend. Be it a puppy, senior dog, or a furry friend somewhere in between….we have a pet for you! Bring your whole family down with your application and meet our crew!

Saturday, July 26th
10-2pm
Issaquah Petco

An approved application will be required prior to taking your new dog home. Please send in an application today and we will process it as soon as possible. Although you will also have the opportunity to  fill out an application at the event, you will need pre-approval to complete an adoption. Click here to get the adoption application.
If you already have an approved application on file with PUP, please email our adoption  coordinator, trish@pupdogrescue.org, to let her know which dog you are interested in meeting. We’ll want to have your application on hand.

“Enough is enough,” video stands up to dogfighting

Love this video by Paw Justice! This video demonstrates the lifestyle of dogfighting and how it affects everyone involved, even responsible dog owners. Dogfighting is a felony in all 50 states because it causes immeasurable suffering to animals, and promotes insensitivity to that suffering and enthusiasm for violence. Dogs used in these events often die of blood loss, shock, dehydration, exhaustion, or infection hours or even days after the fight. Other animals are often sacrificed as well. Please share this video with your social networks and raise awareness about the harsh reality of dogfighting and what YOU can do to prevent it.

“Loved the fact that the bikers came in to save the day! It helps to illustrate one thing that pits and humans have in common. Don’t judge a book by its cover! He/she may look intimidating, but under that hard shell beats a heart of pure gold!!”

What can I do to help stop dogfighting?

  • Learn how to spot the signs of dogfighting. If you suspect dogfighting activity, alert your local law enforcement agency and urge officials to contact The HSUS for practical tools, advice and assistance.
  • Post our dogfighting reward posters [PDF] in your community. For free posters, send us an email (include your name, address and the number of posters you’d like). Learn about our Pets for Life program and how to get involved in your community.
  • If you live in one of the states where being a spectator or other aspects of dogfighting is still a misdemeanor, please write to your state legislators and urge them to make it a felony.
  • Share videos like the above with your social networks and friends!

*content sourced from the Humane Society.

Adopt a dog this Saturday in Kirkland

Join PUP, our volunteers and our adoptable dogs on Saturday June 28th! Bring the whole family, and your furry friends, and see if you next family member is ready to go home with you. An approved application will be required prior to taking your new dog home. Please send in an application today and we will process it as soon as possible. Although you will also have the opportunity to  fill out an application at the event, you will need pre-approval to complete an adoption. Click here to get the adoption application.

KIRKLAND PETCO

Saturday, June 28, 10am – 2pm

12040 NE 85th Street

Kirkland, WA 98033

If you already have an approved application on file with PUP, please email our adoption coordinator, trish@pupdogrescue.org, to let her know which dog you are interested in meeting. We’ll want to have your application on hand.

The biting dog

Posted from Dog’s Day Out

Dog bites are no fun. I’ve been on the end of the leash holding the biter and I’ve been on the receiving end (long ago, when I didn’t know any better!) and both ends stink.

In my work, I see a lot of dogs who bite and even more with the potential to bite. The vast majority of the dogs I see are biting out of fear. No, it doesn’t look like they are fearful and scared to most people; it looks like they are mean, vicious and nasty. Unless you know what you are looking at. Most people do not have any idea that their dog is acting this way because they are afraid. There are certainly dogs that bite for other reasons too but I find them much more rare and so for the purpose of this essay I am talking about the majority of (fear-based) biting dogs I see.

When I meet with these dogs and clients what I find most fascinating is not that the dog I am seeing has bitten but that the person finds it so surprising when it happens. When I meet dogs with a bite history the majority of them are already sending out strong signals that they are about to bite. People just don’t see them. If only people spent as much time and effort learning to “read” their dog, as they did picking out his cute collar and bed… and yes, I too buy my dog cute collars, fancy food and comfy bedding but to me loving my dog is not about all that stuff; instead it is about understanding him, respecting him as a dog and letting him be a dog (that’s a whole other topic…). Humans are supposed to be the more evolved species, right? So then isn’t it our responsibility to figure out how he communicates and what he needs?

A dog that bites is a dog that is under some kind of stress. A dog that bites is a dog that is uncomfortable, maybe scared and/or anxious (anxiety does seem to be a common denominator with many biting dogs). Don’t we feel bad for a child who is scared, anxious or nervous? Don’t we want to help them? If so, why do people come to me angry at their dog who acts this way? Well, because it’s rude to bite. It’s unacceptable. It’s embarrassing to have a dog like this. It makes us mad. The kicker is, if a human can see that their dog is under stress they can remove the dog from that stressful situation and prevent the bite. This has absolutely nothing to do with training or behavior modification. It is simply knowing a dog as an individual, what he can tolerate and respecting his limits. Once we do this, then we can work on (through training and behavior modification) expanding those limits and thresholds.

A dog that bites has been pushed to that point and has most likely given numerous signals that he is uncomfortable prior the bite occurring. The first signal people often notice (because it is auditory) is a growl. Never ever reprimand your dog for growling, it is a warning! Next we may see a lip curl, then an air snap and finally, a bite. Here’s the kicker, even before the growl there is usually an orientation to the subject of the bite, body stiffening/freezing, staring, pinned back ears… lots of signals. Yes, it’s true some dogs give clearer and more obvious signals than others (to generalize, it is usually easier to read an Aussie than a Mastiff!) but with most dogs, some kind of signal is being given. You may need to figure out your dog’s specific signals.

People misread their dogs all the time. A disturbing example I see frequently are photos of children hugging dogs where the dog is half-moon-eyed, ears pinned back with their body pulling away and the photo captions and comments are “soooo cute!” and “best friends.” Ugh. Not cute, best friends -says who? To me, these photos are chilling and unfortunately, I can’t say I’m surprised when that dog bites. No, he didn’t “just bite out of nowhere.” He was telling you all along and he finally had to increase the severity of his message because no one was paying attention! Do some dogs learn to tolerate hugging? Sure they do. Do some dogs actually like it? Sure, I think some actually do. But does your dog like it? Or is he just tolerating you? Does he dislike it so much he could be pushed to bite? Do you know?

Dogs are most apt to bite when they are sleeping, eating or cornered. I think most people understand the sleeping and eating scenarios but cornered is harder to grasp. Cornered just means no easy exit for the dog who is uncomfortable and wants to get outta dodge! Cornered could mean the dog is on leash, therefore unable to escape the situation or he could be on a dog bed that is wedged between the wall and the coffee table with no easy route around the guest who is now sitting on the couch between that wall and coffee table. He could be embraced in a hug, or in a small veterinary exam room. He could be “trapped” in a narrow entrance hallway when a visitor enters your home. Take a look at where your dog’s bed is positioned. Take a look at the entrances and exits he has available if he wants to retreat. Don’t let strangers, dog or human, approach him on leash. (You can read more about my opinion on that here: Leash Greetings).

So, how do we “read” our dogs? Simple – look at his body. Notice what exactly his body looks like (position, tension, gaze) when he is happy and relaxed and see how he looks when he is stressed, nervous, anxious or “mad.” He can’t speak English but he can most definitely tell you how he feels. You just have to notice. You are your dog’s protector and advocate. “Listen” to him! Here’s a link to more specifics on canine Body Language.

When I think about my work, I find some of my most gratifying moments are when I am working with a client and they finally stop blaming and labeling their dog (“stubborn,” “dumb,” “aggressive”). Instead, that person learns how to read and understand their dog. They learn that no, their dog is not any of those labels; he is actually just feeling scared, nervous or anxious. So now, instead of being angry at their dog, they have compassion and sympathy for their dog and are able to take on the role of caretaker instead of enforcer. All of a sudden, that human-dog relationship is transformed from one of angst and opposition, to one of understanding, care and respect. Everything changes. I see it. I see people’s whole attitude and well, body language (!) change around their dog.

The root of training your dog is in your relationship with your dog. To have a good relationship you need to understand (“read”) each other. Changing that relationship to a positive (happy and FUN!), understanding and mutually beneficial one is the best thing I can possibly “train” my clients.

This dog is NOT happy.clipper hug 3x4

This dog is.

HandsomeDan&baby

 

Can you tell the difference?

Shop On Amazon and Support PUP!

How to support PUP by shopping on Amazon

The AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price from your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to PUP! When you shop at smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the same low prices, selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to PUP.

How do I shop at amazonsmile and support PUP?

If you have an existing Amazon.com account, logout. Then, go to http://smile.amazon.com. Enter your Email address and password and click on the yellow “Sign In” button. If you need to create a new account, click on the “Create an account” link. See next step for instructions on creating an account.

How do I create an amazon.com account? (skip if you already have an account)

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After you click on the “Create an account” link. The window will show where you can enter your Name, Email address, Phone Number and Password. Finally, click on the “Create Amazon Account” link.

How do I make PUP my charity?

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Enter “People United For Pets” in the search box and click on the “Search” button.

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“People United For Pets” in “Issaquah WA” should be near the top of the results. Click on the yellow “Select” button.

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A new window will appear confirming your selection has been made. You can also share and encourage your friends to lend a hand as well by clicking on the Facebook or Twitter icon. There is an option to install an add on for your browser. Click on “Dismiss” to close the window.

How do I ensure my purchases are being credited to PUP?

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Just registering for PUP as your charity won’t have the credits automatically applied. You need to shop through http://smile.amazon.com. If you have installed the browser plugin, you will be automatically redirected to the Amazon Smile page. You will see in the upper left of the web page “Supporting: People United For Pets.” Otherwise, go to http://smile.amazon.com and bookmark that page. Remember to shop through that bookmark rather than simply through http://amazon.com

May 17th Adoption Event in Kirkland

Join PUP, our volunteers and our adoptable dogs on Saturday May 17th! Bring the whole family, and your furry friends, and see if you next family member is ready to go home with you. An approved application will be required prior to taking your new dog home. Please send in an application today and we will process it as soon as possible. Although you will also have the opportunity to  fill out an application at the event, you will need pre-approval to complete an adoption. Click here to get the adoption application.

KIRKLAND PETCO

12040 NE 85th Street

Kirkland, WA 98033

emma

If you already have an approved application on file with PUP, please email our adoption coordinator, trish@pupdogrescue.org, to let her know which dog you are interested in meeting. We’ll want to have your application on hand.

Donate to Roary’s Fund

Roary Before AfterRoary is a 2 year old Terrier mix PUP Dog Rescue pulled from the Stockton Animal Shelter this April. When we first saw him, he was a matted mess and walked on three legs. The vet said one of his legs had a fused bone that wouldn’t allow his leg to bend or be used normally, however that was only one of the many injuries they found. Apparently Roary had either been kicked, stomped on or run over with something, repeatedly…and his injuries and pain are severe.

We took Roary into our local vets office to have his leg evaluated to see if we could make his life better. What Laura Tonkin, Founder and Director of PUP Dog Rescue, heard brought her to tears:

“Dr. Ritchie called and asked to talk with me about Roary, in front of his x-rays. I knew this was something pretty serious. I’ve seen a lot of x-rays in the past 9 years of rescue, but I’d never seen anything like this before. The moment Dr. Ritchie placed the first slide up, I just covered my mouth. I could not believe what I was looking at and was in shock at the pain this little guy must have suffered. Bones were going in every direction. I could see the end of the bones looking like knives or shards of glass. This was the worst case of cruelty the vet had ever seen. Roary had either been kicked, stomped on or run over with something, repeatedly…”xrays

“It took everything in my power to restrain myself; Roary’s situation had just broken my heart. What kind of person could kick, stomp on or run over an animal repeatedly to cause this level of damage? My anger for this person turned into a question of how we were going to pay for the many, many, many expensive surgeries this dog would need. I remember standing at his kennel at the shelter, when he first came up, looking at this matted scared mess that didn’t move. We asked the vet to look at his leg. The staff shaved him, bathed him, examined him, and brought him back to his kennel, and the moment his little paws hit the ground, he was happy and joyful and playing with his two kennel mates (which we also brought home to PUP). Roary has so much joy despite his situation, and we said in unison, He’s coming to PUP.”

PUP is working to raise the money to pay for Roary’s vet costs which will include surgeries continuing for months due to all of his injuries. Today marks his first of many surgeries (on his left leg), with a substantial IOU plastered to our vet file from our Director. Once his left leg heals we will do surgery on his right leg, then pelvis. This will be a long road for our boy, but our volunteers are in this for the long haul.

We have contacted the Stockton Animal Shelter and asked for his owner to be tracked down and brought to justice for animal cruelty. However, we just learned the owners could not be found so the justice Roary will receive will be through the love and care he will be given while with us.

Please consider donating to Roary’s Fund, and sharing his story in hopes we can educate the public about animal cruelty and valuable work that rescue organizations bring to those who have no voice. His foster says “he has a great big smile in his soul and a bubble of joy in his heart. He is such a love and deserves the best life has to give.”

Donate to Roary’s Fund

2014 So Far…

We’ve already helped a total of 86 dogs and cats find homes in 2014. Thank you to our partners and volunteers for allowing us to find, save and rehome these pets!

Our recent “shelter sweep” resulted in a total of 35 dogs and cats making the trip from Stockton and Merced to PUP. Each dog and cat was very carefully evaluated on-site by Laura Tonkin, PUP‘s Founder/Director, and Meryl Reber, PUP‘s Treasurer.

Our fosters have been delighted with the personalities of these new additions and believe they will find wonderful homes in the Puget Sound area. 

To see our available dogs and cats, click here! If you want to become a part of our volunteer network, click here!
Minne has found her forever home through PUP!

Minne has found her forever home through PUP!